CHICAGO — With concerns mounting from physicians and public health advocates nationwide about the health dangers associated with powdered alcohol, the American Medical Association (AMA) today adopted policy during its Annual Meeting supporting federal and state laws banning powdered alcohol in the United States. Approved by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau in 2015, powered alcohol, also known as "Palcohol," is equivalent to a standard-sized cocktail when mixed with six ounces of liquid.

"Given the variety of flavors that could be enticing to youth and concerns that the final alcohol concentration could be much greater than intended by the manufacturer, we believe that powdered alcohol has the potential to cause serious harm to minors and should be banned," said AMA Board Member Jesse M. Ehrenfeld, M.D. "We urge states and the federal government to prevent powdered alcohol from being manufactured, distributed, imported and sold in the U.S."

Alcohol is the most widely used substance of abuse among America's young people, and, when used in excess, it is responsible for 4,300 deaths among underage youth each year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Amidst growing concerns about the product's appeal and availability to youth, more than 30 states have passed laws or administrative policies banning powdered alcohol.

The AMA has been a long-time advocate for reducing youth access to alcohol and is a strong supporter of banning the marketing of alcohol products that appeal to people under age 21.

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The American Medical Association is the physicians’ powerful ally in patient care. As the only medical association that convenes 190+ state and specialty medical societies and other critical stakeholders, the AMA represents physicians with a unified voice to all key players in health care.  The AMA leverages its strength by removing the obstacles that interfere with patient care, leading the charge to prevent chronic disease and confront public health crises and, driving the future of medicine to tackle the biggest challenges in health care.