With infection rates of Zika virus increasing rapidly, physicians should be prepared to handle cases of the virus and answer patients' questions. In the continental United States, Zika cases have been confirmed in returning travelers and infections through sexual transmission have been documented. The Florida Department of Health has concluded that a high likelihood exists that Zika virus infections are being caused by bites of local Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. As a result, a travel warning has been issued for the Wynwood and Miami Beach areas of Miami-Dade County, Florida. The AMA will update this resource center regularly to provide information to the public, physicians and other health care workers as they seek to learn more.

LINK 1: Florida Department of Health

LINK 2: CDC

View CDC/AMA webinar on Zika virus

The CDC/AMA webinar "Preparing for Zika Transmission in the U.S." presented by the AMA in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is now available for viewing. Listen to CDC Medical Epidemiologist Susan Hills, MBBS, MTH, present an update on the epidemiological and clinical aspects of the current outbreak. CDC Medical Officer Kiran Perkins, MD, MPH, presented on the implications for pregnant women, including CDC's updated interim clinical guidance, before fielding questions from webinar participants.

VIDEO 1: Access webinar

Updated information on Zika virus

The CDC Health Alert Network: CDC Expands Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women, Women of Reproductive Age and Their Partners for Zika Virus Infection Related to Mosquito-Born Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade, Florida.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its recommendation for men with possible Zika virus exposure who are considering trying to conceive with their partners. The updated guidance recommends waiting at least 6 months to conceive after symptom onset or last possible Zika virus exposure (if asymptomatic). The recommendation is based on new scientific evidence and is consistent with the World Health Organization guidance.

LINK 3: Updated information on Zika virus

LINK 4: Resources for the public

LINK 5: Resources for physicians: Understanding Zika virus

LINK 6: Resources for physicians: Clinical guidance

LINK 7: Medical journal articles

LINK 8: Medical products

LINK 9: Occupational exposure

LINK 10: Research

LINK 11: Vector control

PDF: Advocacy letter: House

LINK 12: Advocacy letter: Senate

With infection rates of Zika virus increasing rapidly, physicians should be prepared to handle cases of the virus and answer patients' questions. In the continental United States, Zika cases have been confirmed in returning travelers and infections through sexual transmission have been documented. The Florida Department of Health has concluded that a high likelihood exists that Zika virus infections are being caused by bites of local Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. As a result, a travel warning has been issued for the Wynwood and Miami Beach areas of Miami-Dade County, Florida. The AMA will update this resource center regularly to provide information to the public, physicians and other health care workers as they seek to learn more.

LINK 1: Florida Department of Health

LINK 2: CDC

View CDC/AMA webinar on Zika virus

The CDC/AMA webinar "Preparing for Zika Transmission in the U.S." presented by the AMA in partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is now available for viewing. Listen to CDC Medical Epidemiologist Susan Hills, MBBS, MTH, present an update on the epidemiological and clinical aspects of the current outbreak. CDC Medical Officer Kiran Perkins, MD, MPH, presented on the implications for pregnant women, including CDC's updated interim clinical guidance, before fielding questions from webinar participants.

VIDEO 1: Access webinar

Updated information on Zika virus

The CDC Health Alert Network: CDC Expands Guidance for Travel and Testing of Pregnant Women, Women of Reproductive Age and Their Partners for Zika Virus Infection Related to Mosquito-Born Zika Virus Transmission in Miami-Dade, Florida.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its recommendation for men with possible Zika virus exposure who are considering trying to conceive with their partners. The updated guidance recommends waiting at least 6 months to conceive after symptom onset or last possible Zika virus exposure (if asymptomatic). The recommendation is based on new scientific evidence and is consistent with the World Health Organization guidance.

LINK 3: Updated information on Zika virus

LINK 4: Resources for the public

LINK 5: Resources for physicians: Understanding Zika virus

LINK 6: Resources for physicians: Clinical guidance

LINK 7: Medical journal articles

LINK 8: Medical products

LINK 9: Occupational exposure

LINK 10: Research

LINK 11: Vector control

PDF: Advocacy letter: House

LINK 12: Advocacy letter: Senate

VIDEO 1: Access Webinar​​​​​​​

AMA-CDC Zika webinar

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An AMA membership means you’ve got access to world-class clinical research, education and insights. Access peer-reviewed medical research findings and editorial opinions from JAMA®, the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA Network Open™ and the 11 specialty journals, with CME at no cost.

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Why Join the AMA?

An AMA membership means you’ve got access to world-class clinical research, education and insights. Access peer-reviewed medical research findings and editorial opinions from JAMA®, the Journal of the American Medical Association, JAMA Network Open™ and the 11 specialty journals, with CME at no cost.

Join Now