CREATING THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE FUTURE

The AMA is collaborating to accelerate change in medical education by creating a system that trains physicians to meet the needs of today's patients and to anticipate future changes.

Accelerating change in medical education with visionary partners and bold innovations

The initiative has funded major innovations at medical schools and brought these schools together into a consortium that shares best practices and lessons learned. The consortium is disseminating the proven transformation strategies emerging from these leading medical schools across the medical education environment.

Great minds are at work accelerating change in medical education

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We know it’s time to change. Schools want to change, and we’ve gathered together people who are doing projects that are really making a difference in the way physicians are trained for the future.

Susan E. Skochelak, MD, MPH Group vice president,
Medical Education, AMA

Susan E. Skochelak

Our innovations:
Transforming Medical Education

The Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium schools are working synergistically to develop common solutions to transform medical education in key areas.

Developing

Developing flexible, competency-based pathways

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Teaching

Teaching new content in health care delivery sciences

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Working

Working with health care delivery systems in novel ways

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Developing

Making technology work for learning

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Developing

Envisioning the master adaptive learner

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Developing

Shaping tomorrow’s leaders

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Developing flexible, competency-based pathways

Medical education at all levels—undergraduate, graduate and continuing—is shifting away from emphasizing time spent in lectures and in classrooms and toward establishing that the necessary knowledge and skills have been acquired for transition to residency and patient care. Schools are incorporating milestones and entrustable professional activities (EPAs) into the curriculum to determine the best path for students to follow in order to move to the next level of training. These flexible, competency-based pathways create physicians who continually assess and update their abilities and address any deficiencies throughout their careers.

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The competencies that our students need to have when they graduate from our medical schools are going to really be quite dramatically different than they were 50 or 100 years ago when medical school was structured. Is that going to impact patient care and the health of the patients they take care of? Absolutely, yes. Is their ability to be lifelong learners and constantly adapt going to impact that care? Absolutely, yes. So, we need to make sure as a medical school that we’re empowering these students to not only have the new competencies but to be lifelong learners.

Marc Triola, MD
Principal investigator and associate dean, educational informatics, New York University School of Medicine

Marc
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Teaching new content in health care delivery sciences

To fully serve patients today and into the future, physicians need to know more than biomedical and clinical sciences—they need to understand the new content of health care delivery science. This new discipline includes understanding how to improve health care quality, increase the value of care provided, enhance patient safety, deliver population-based medical care and work collaboratively in teams. Physicians need to learn how to advocate for their patients and communities and understand the socio-ecological determinants of health, health care policy and health care economics.

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It’s time for us to take a leap forward in educating physicians for the health care delivery models of the future—those that aim to improve not just the health of the individual patient and their family, but also the community and the population. To achieve this, we need to bring in issues such as safety, quality improvement, health disparities, bias and population health.

Jeffrey Borkan, MD, PHD
Co-investigator and chair, Department of Family Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Jeffrey
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Working with health care delivery systems in novel ways

Consortium schools are creating new learning experiences embedded within health care systems that not only teach principles of health care delivery sciences, but also bring value to the health care system. Training students to be patient navigators, to plan and execute quality improvement projects and to perform important functions that benefit patient-centered teams serve dual purposes—students learn about health care delivery by working in authentic settings, and they are able to contribute to improving the health of patients in meaningful ways.

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The really innovative part is the authentic, in-depth clinical experience of students serving as patient navigators, both within our health system and also health systems in south-central Pennsylvania.

Jed Gonzalo, MD
Assistant dean, health systems education, Penn State College of Medicine

Jed
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Making technology work for learning

The Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium schools are adapting technology in new ways to solve key problems and advance physician training. They are teaching the use of electronic health records, management of patient panels to improve health outcomes, and interpretation of “big data” on health care costs and utilization in order to learn how to best use resources.

In addition, schools are applying learning technology to manage individualized, flexible progress by assessing student competencies along their medical education journey. New tools are being used to compile assessment data that will allow for easier self-assessment by students and review with faculty coaches. Badges and other methods of credentialing enable students to differentiate along “threads,” or areas of scholarly concentration, as they progress through individualized tracks.

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With our teaching electronic medical record, which is a clone of an existing electronic medical record that contains patient de-identified data, patient privacy is protected, but our students will have an electronic medical record as a learning lab. We are now completing the de-identification of the patients for that system as well as building curriculum because those two have to come hand in hand.

Sara Jo Grethlein, MD
Principal investigator and associate dean, undergraduate medical education, Indiana University School of Medicine

Sara
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Envisioning the master adaptive learner

Physicians need to rapidly access and interpret continuously evolving information and to understand how the use of new data supports the delivery of the best patient care. One of the aims of the consortium is to assist physicians in becoming master adaptive learners—an expert, self-directed, self-regulated and lifelong workplace learner. Preparing today’s medical students for careers in the changing health care system requires more than clinical skills. Faculty must help medical students develop skills in adaptive learning, too.

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We have no idea what medical systems will look like 10 years from now when today’s students will enter the workforce, let alone when they’ve been in practice 20 years. By training them to be master adaptive learners, we are giving them the tools to adapt.

Martin Pusic, MD, PhD
Co-investigator and director, division of education quality and analytics, Institute for Innovations in Medical Education, New York University School of Medicine

Martin
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Shaping tomorrow's leaders

Future physicians will need to do more than deliver high-quality care. To be effective in the modern health care system, they will need to possess the ability to lead teams and participate in effecting positive change. Consortium schools are integrating leadership and teamwork training into curricula that will prepare today’s medical students to become future leaders. Consortium schools are implementing new learning experiences in leadership, including identified leadership tracks that focus on hands-on experiential education, advanced coursework and learning exercises.

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We need physicians who can use resources wisely, who can work in partnerships with patients and their families, who can work within communities to improve the health of the communities, who can be effective leaders in health care systems so that the health that we envision for ourselves and for our communities can be realized.

Susan E. Skochelak, MD, MPH
Group vice president, Medical Education, American Medical Association

Susan

Creating the medical school of the future

This report captures the exciting and challenging journey to reimagine physician education from the ground up. Learn more about the consortium schools, the initial phases of their work and the extensive collaborative effort involved.

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Creating the Medical School of the Future