CREATING THE MEDICAL SCHOOL OF THE FUTURE

The AMA is collaborating to accelerate change in medical education by creating a system that trains physicians to meet the needs of today's patients and to anticipate future changes.

Participating Schools
A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Joined January 2016
Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin

Joined January 2016
Eastern Virginia Medical School

Joined January 2016
Emory University School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Joined January 2016
Harvard Medical School

Joined January 2016
Indiana University School of Medicine

Joined September 2013
Mayo Medical School

Joined September 2013
Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Joined January 2016
Morehouse School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
New York University School of Medicine

Joined September 2013
Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Joined January 2016
Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

Joined September 2013
Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine

Joined September 2013
The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Joined January 2016
Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University

Joined January 2016
Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

Joined September 2013
The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Joined September 2013
University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

Joined September 2013
University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine

Joined September 2013
University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
University of Michigan Medical School

Joined September 2013
University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine

Joined January 2016
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Joined January 2016
University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
University of Utah School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
University of Washington School of Medicine

Joined January 2016
Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Joined September 2013

Consortium Schools

The AMA is accelerating change in medical education.

The AMA consortium consists of 32 medical schools working together to create the medical school of the future and transform physician training. Eleven of these schools founded the consortium in 2013 and received grants from the AMA for major medical education innovations.

In 2015 the AMA selected 21 additional schools to become consortium members and continue spreading innovative medical education ideas. An estimated 19,000 medical students—18% of all U.S. allopathic and osteopathic medical students—study at medical schools that are consortium members. Learn about each school's work.

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A.T. Still University, School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona

Principal investigator: Joy H. Lewis, DO, PhD
Professor, chair of public health, and director, practice-based research

A.T. Still University—School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, in partnership with the National Association of Community Health Centers, is pioneering a total-immersion-training model. Students are embedded in 12 urban and rural community health centers for the 2nd, 3rd and 4th years of their undergraduate medical education. They conduct needs assessments and perform community-based research, quality improvement projects or service projects that recognize the local social and economic determinants of health.


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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Patricia Thomas, MD
Vice dean, medical education

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine is expanding on the patient-navigator model to develop medical students' ability to work as part of interprofessional teams in patient-centered medical home practices. The teams manage and assess the needs of a panel of 20 patients within each practice.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin

Principal investigator: Elizabeth Nelson, MD
Associate dean, undergraduate medical education

The Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin is designing, implementing and evaluating a leadership curriculum that will cover all 4 years of medical school. The goals are to focus medical students on the challenges of 21st-century health and medicine and to engage students’ creativity and aptitudes in solving those challenges.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Eastern Virginia Medical School

Principal investigator: Christine Matson, MD
Chair, department of family medicine

Eastern Virginia Medical School has launched its CareForward curriculum in order to provide students with a better understanding of health care delivery science and make students catalysts for much-needed change in health care.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Emory University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: John Eley, MD, MPH
Executive dean, education

Emory University School of Medicine is standardizing education in quality improvement and patient safety across the medical education continuum, including medical students, residents, fellows, faculty, affiliated physicians and interprofessional colleagues. The goal is to ensure all members of the Emory medical community have a shared understanding and approach to quality improvement and patient safety.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine

Principal investigator: Onelia Lage, MD
Vice chair, education

Florida International University Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine has launched the Green Family Foundation Neighborhood Health Education and Learning Program. The curriculum focuses on the social and behavioral social determinants of health to provide a longitudinal and interprofessional community-based experience for medical students.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Harvard Medical School

Principal investigator: Edward Krupat, PhD
Director, Center for Evaluation

Harvard Medical School has launched its Pathways Curriculum with the goal of creating master adaptive learners who are self-directed, reflective, curious, cognitively flexible and capable of embracing uncertainty. To achieve this goal, Harvard has reorganized its entire curriculum, utilizing new active-learning models and creating a mastery-oriented culture.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Indiana University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Bradley Allen, MD, PhD
Senior associate dean for medical student education

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The Indiana University School of Medicine's initiative creates a virtual health care system (vHS) and a teaching electronic medical record (tEMR) to ensure competencies in system-, team- and population-based health care as well as clinical decision-making. Faculty are being trained as quality systems coaches in current health systems practice and are prepared to expertly use the tEMR, which is a clone of a health care system's actual clinical care EMR. The 1st phase of educational activities using this tool addresses health care financing, access to care, quality improvement and health care disparities.

Students practice in virtual clinics with faculty serving as virtual attendings. Students will use the tEMR to review patient data and write virtual orders and notes that become part of the tEMR but do not appear in the de-identified patient's real EMRs. Students will see the costs of interventions they order, and this information will be compared with publicly available databases to discuss the impact of demographic and insurance factors on health care delivery.

In addition, this competency-based curriculum focuses on quality improvement and patient safety. Technology improves student's ability to practice systems- and team-based care for individual patients and patient populations. The project runs sequentially over each year of medical school across all phases of the curriculum for all students.


Transforming medical education at Indiana

Indiana Video

“An exciting aspect of our project [is that it is] rolling out to other medical schools. We thought it was a great idea for Indiana University, but it turns out that multiple other medical schools also think it's a good idea and want to implement the system that we're developing in their medical schools.” — Blaine Takesue, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

Mayo Medical School

Principal investigator: Lotte N. Dyrbye, MD, MHPE
Professor of medicine and medical education

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Mayo Medical School is creating an educational model to prepare students to practice within and lead patient-centered, community-oriented, science-driven collaborative care teams that deliver high-value care. To accomplish this goal, Mayo is working closely with health system leaders and has launched teams that will develop detailed educational models for each of the 6 science of health care delivery domains.

While these models are under development, the school has created early science of health care delivery experiences around the topics of patient- and population-centered care, teamwork, health policy and economics. Mayo is developing milestones and novel assessment strategies to allow for flexible progression through the curriculum.

In addition, as physician well-being impacts patient outcomes and access to care, Mayo is developing curricula and tools to enhance student well-being and resiliency. Mayo is testing the functionality of the Medical Student Well-Being Index, which allows self-assessment of distress and immediate access to local and national resources. The school has also created wellness learning modules and has implemented a required curriculum focused on wellness and resiliency with facilitated-small group discussion.


Transforming medical education at Mayo

Mayo Video

“Mayo Medical School's project really is focusing on developing curriculums for science of health care delivery, so teaching students how to work in teams, how to deliver patient-centered care, but also have a population-oriented lens. In the meantime, we're focusing on how to do individualized progression, so students can go through medical school as they develop their competencies, and also teaching them really how to be more resilient, how to maintain personal health while you're working in a very stressful environment.” — Lotte N. Dyrbye, MD, MHPE


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine

Principal investigator: Saroj Misra, DO
Director, clinical clerkship curriculum

Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine is launching a longitudinal curricular innovation to help medical students acquire the knowledge, skills and tools essential for the promotion of patient safety. Planned learning activities begin in the 1st year of medical school, continue during clerkship and culminate with synthesis-level projects in the 1st year of residency.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Morehouse School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Martha Elks, MD, PhD
Senior associate dean, educational affairs

Morehouse School of Medicine is increasing its class size and the number of community-based sites participating in the educational process. The goal is to expand the school's social mission while enhancing community-engaged training.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

New York University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Marc Triola, MD
Associate dean, educational informatics

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New York University (NYU) School of Medicine is creating the NYU Health Care by the Numbers Curriculum, a flexible 3-year, individualized, technology-enabled blended curriculum to improve care coordination and care quality. The foundation for the curriculum is virtual patient panels derived from de-identified patient data gathered from NYU Langone Medical Center physician network practices panels immerse students in the data of a simulated group practice setting. These patient panels are available for use by other schools.

The NYU Health Care by the Numbers Curriculum emphasizes the use of big data and technology for patient and population management and includes an ePortfolio that allows students to track their own activities for quality improvement, safety and value-added care. A new online portal for student self-directed learning is being used and updated based on student experiences.


Transforming medical education at NYU

New York Video

“For the 1st time in the history of our educational program, our medical students are analyzing and managing and looking at patients' health through the lens of big, authentic clinical data sets.” — Marc Triola, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine

Principal investigator: Isaac Kirstein, DO
Dean, Cleveland campus

Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine (OU-HCOM) is developing a new osteopathic medical education Value-Based Care curriculum, which is an innovative, competency-based program that integrates primary care delivery and medical education. The curriculum is being developed by a team of medical and education professionals from OU-HCOM and the Cleveland Clinic and will be implemented at the OU-HCOM Cleveland campus.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: George C. Mejicano, MD, MS
Senior associate dean, education

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Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) School of Medicine is implementing a novel, learner-centered, competency-based curriculum. This program enables students to advance through individualized learning plans as they achieve key milestones tracked by a personal portfolio. Additionally, faculty members serve as student coaches and mentors, teaching and assessing skills related to informatics, quality science and interprofessional teamwork. Students will be able to complete medical school based on demonstration of meeting defined milestones. The program creates master adaptive learners who are accustomed to continuous self-assessment and professional development. Students who successfully complete this program are prepared to manage the needs of patients and populations.

This curriculum began at OHSU in August 2014 and includes a system that awards students a badge for each entrustable professional activity that is mastered. In addition, to increase the number of valuable experiences in the learning environment, OHSU has developed communities of learners and identified 28 faculty members to act as portfolio coaches.


Transforming medical education at OHSU

Oregon Health Video

“We want students to improve themselves and improve the systems that they will work in, to improve society.” — George C. Mejicano, MD, MS


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine

Principal investigator: Therese M. Wolpaw, MD
Vice dean, educational affairs

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Penn State College of Medicine's initiative involves collaborating with the leaders of affiliated health systems in central Pennsylvania to design educational experiences that align medical education with health system needs. Its Systems Navigation Curriculum (SyNC) launched in August 2014 and combines a course in the science of health systems with an immersive experience as a patient navigator. The curriculum integrates core systems sciences such as health policy, high-value care and population and public health with 2 threads related to evidence-based medicine, along with teamwork and leadership training throughout 7 modules. Educational objectives, content and cases for the small group and a seminar-based 17-month course have been developed in collaboration with health system leaders in the central Pennsylvania region.

The patient navigation component of the curriculum began with all 1st-year medical students interviewing standardized patients portraying high utilizer or vulnerable patient scenarios. In October 2014, 85 out of approximately 150 1st-year medical students were embedded at clinical sites across central Pennsylvania working as patient navigators. To prepare for the patient navigator program, Penn State conducted visits to clinical settings that would support the patient navigators and completed data collection on relationships with external agencies/health systems and clinical sites.


Transforming medical education at Penn State

Penn State Video

“We need to start talking to engineering schools and business schools and community leaders and nursing and physician assistant programs and begin to provide truly authentic diverse learning experiences for our students.” — Therese M. Wolpaw, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Vineet Arora, MD
Associate professor and assistant dean, scholarship and discovery

The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine is creating and implementing a longitudinal experiential program to train and empower all medical students with the knowledge and skills to serve as effective advocates for health care delivery science. Pritzker is utilizing novel technological tools, such as an online microblogging learning community with trained faculty coaches and point-of-care applications on mobile devices, to prepare and support students for their clinical advocacy roles in the health system.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

Principal investigator: Sherine Gabriel, MD, MSc
Dean

Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is incorporating medical students and other health-profession learners into care-coordination teams of the Robert Wood Johnson Partners Accountable Care Organization (ACO) in order to augment care for patients with multiple chronic conditions and to maximize integrated care delivery in the home setting. By learning about health-systems science in a real world ACO, these future physicians will be better able to address the goals of the Triple Aim—improving the patient experience of care, improving population health and reducing per capita costs of health care.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University

Principal investigator: Steven Herrine, MD
Vice dean

Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University is working with founding members of the Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium to incorporate the teaching of electronic medical records into the curriculum.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Sophie Davis Biomedical Education/CUNY School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Erica Friedman, MD
Deputy dean

The Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education/City College of New York is partnering with community health centers to create meaningful roles, including patient navigators, health coaches and assistants who monitor patient quality measures, for medical students in ambulatory settings.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University

Principal investigator: Elizabeth Baxley, MD
Senior associate dean, academic affairs

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The initiative at The Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University establishes a comprehensive longitudinal core curriculum in patient safety, quality improvement, population health and team-based care for all medical students. Components of the curriculum are integrated with other health-related disciplines to foster interprofessional skills and prepare students to successfully lead health care teams for systems-based health care transformation. The curriculum includes completion of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Certificate Program, system-wide patient safety seminars, problem-based learning cases and new objective structured clinical examinations and simulation cases that incorporate delivery-system science principles. Process improvement exercises are also being built into existing courses and clerkships.

As part of the implementation of the curriculum, Brody established its Teachers of Quality Academy to provide faculty development in the new competencies that were to be incorporated in the medical school curriculum. Faculty members participating in the Teachers of Quality Academy lead quality and safety efforts in their health care system and are helping to design the new integrated curriculum across all 4 years of a medical student's experience. They also will serve as faculty mentors and teachers for this curriculum. For a smaller cohort of students, Brody has established a Leaders in INnovative Care (LINC) scholars program. Up to 10 students are enrolled in LINC per year beginning mid-2015. These students complete advanced coursework and experiential activities leading to a distinction in Healthcare Transformation and Leadership in addition to their MD degrees.


Transforming medical education at Brody

Brody School Video

“What will come from this will be a collection of new curriculum components—new cases, new simulations, new group exercises, new interprofessional training that map to our medical education curriculum throughout.” — Elizabeth Baxley, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Principal investigator: Allan Tunkel, MD, PhD
Associate dean, medical education

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The initiative at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University aims to educate medical students to become physician leaders equipped to promote the health of the individuals, communities and populations they serve. To accomplish this, Brown has developed an MD/ScM degree program in primary care and population medicine that enrolled its 1st class in 2015. The new Primary Care-Population Medicine (PC-PM) program will seamlessly integrate the 3rd medical science (health care delivery) with the 1st (basic science) and the 2nd (clinical science) over the 4 years of medical school. The Master of Science degree includes 9 courses, including 1 on health systems and health disparities that has been introduced to all MD students, including those who are not in the PC-PM program.

As part of the PC-PM program, Brown has begun developing population medicine content and identifying sites for its longitudinal integrated clerkships (LIC). These clerkships, which involve students completing all clerkships simultaneously rather than blocks, are being piloted with 8 third-year medical students in May 2015. The LIC will begin with all students doing a combined 6-week experience in inpatient medicine and surgery. Students will then spend 32 weeks with mentors in outpatient family medicine, internal medicine, surgery, psychiatry, neurology, pediatrics and ob-gyn. During the LIC, students will follow a panel of patients and will have didactic sessions on both clinical and population medicine in courses that are part of the master's sequence.

In addition, Brown has been developing a continuum of leadership courses along with a student-led elective course that emphasizes principles of patient safety and quality improvement. The goal is to provide them with the knowledge, attitudes and skills to understand health and disease in context and to be able to enlist system and interprofessional teams and resources in the pursuit of improved population health.


Transforming medical education at Brown

Warren Alpert Video

“Our proposal at Brown is to prepare our graduating medical students to be able to provide care to individual patients and patients as a group.”
— Allen Tunkel, MD, PhD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

University of California, Davis, School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Tonya Fancher, MD, MPH
Associate professor, internal medicine

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The University of California (UC), Davis, initiative, the Accelerated Competency-based Education in Primary Care (ACE-PC) program, establishes a 6-year, competency-based UME-GME pathway linked to Kaiser Permanente Northern California and UC Davis residency programs. UC Davis medical students who are accepted into the ACE-PC program start school 6 weeks earlier than traditional students and complete a pre-matriculation course that prepares them to begin supervised work in a primary care clinic. ACE-PC students learn medical history taking, physical examination skills and clinical reasoning related to common primary care concerns. In their 2nd week, ACE-PC students start their 3-year Kaiser Permanente primary care clinic training under the supervision of dedicated Kaiser Permanente primary care faculty preceptors and coaches.

ACE-PC students remain immersed in Kaiser's integrated health care system and patient-centered medical home for the duration of medical school providing seamless integration between medical education and clinical practice. The clerkship year will be a longitudinal integrated clerkship in which students will complete all clerkships simultaneously rather than in 8-week blocks. Unique curricular content includes population medicine, chronic disease management, quality improvement, patient safety, team-based care and preventive health skills with special emphasis on diverse and underserved populations. The 1st UC Davis ACE-PC students began in 2014.


Transforming medical education at UC Davis

University Of California-Davis

“It seems really important to bridge the gap between UME [undergraduate medical education] and GME [graduate medical education]. These 2 worlds have really lived separately for probably too long.”
— Tonya Fancher, MD, MPH


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Catherine R. Lucey, MD
Vice dean, education

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The new University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), Bridges Curriculum will prepare physicians to achieve competencies needed to promote health and reduce the burden of suffering from illness and disease. This ”Bridges” physician will be a committed professional, whose expertise is grounded in the ability to lead and participate in interprofessional and interdisciplinary teams to deliver high-quality, compassionate patient care, continuously improve our health care delivery systems and contribute to advancement of knowledge. The curriculum is crafted to allow students to contribute to improving health care outcomes today while being educated to work within complex systems to improve health care and advance science for future generations of patients.

The UCSF Bridges Curriculum will enhance the acquisition of enduring knowledge and skills while integrating the emerging knowledge and skills that are critical to becoming a 21st-century physician.


Transforming medical education at UCSF

California San Francisco

“The Bridges Curriculum is trying to jump-start the process improvement that we want to see in the health care system using our very, very talented and purpose-driven students.” — Catherine R. Lucey, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

University of Connecticut School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Suzanne Rose, MD, MSEd
Senior associate dean, education

The University of Connecticut School of Medicine is enhancing the teaching electronic medical record created by founding members of the Accelerating Change in Medical Education Consortium. Students will meet required competencies by working with the medical records of diverse families. These de-identified records will be based on real patients and designed to meet specific learning objectives, requiring students to learn to prioritize and assess pertinent information.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of Michigan Medical School

Principal investigator: Rajesh S. Mangrulkar, MD
Associate dean, medical student education

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The University of Michigan Medical School is transforming its entire curriculum in order to graduate physician leaders who will improve health care at a system and patient level. Intentional leadership development exercises are already underway and will connect with all components of the new curriculum, including the M-Home, which launches in fall 2015. The M-Home is a longitudinal learning community designed to foster a strong professional identity based on doctoring skills, professionalism and an understanding of one's values in the service of medicine. Student expression of leadership will also occur through completion of one of a growing number of scholarly concentrations known as Paths of Excellence.

Implementation is continuing in 2016 with a new 2-year trunk of foundational courses that integrate basic science and clinical experiences from day 1. Flexible professional development branches will follow in the next phase in 2018, allowing students to develop advanced clinical skills, build scientific depth within the clinical setting and be ready for residency on day 1.


Transforming medical education at Michigan

University Of Michigan

“The consortium allows us to come together as a community of innovators, pitching different ideas to each other and learning from each other's struggles.” — Rajesh S. Mangrulkar, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine

Principal investigator: Kelly Caverzagie, MD
Associate dean, educational strategy

University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Medicine is engaging with the health care delivery system to enhance interprofessional education and practice, moving the training beyond the traditional classroom setting and into clinical practice environments.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Julie Byerley, MD, MPH
Vice dean, education

The University of North Carolina School of Medicine has implemented a student-centered and patient-based integrated, modern curriculum called Translational Education at Carolina. This curriculum responds to the changing health care environment with an individualized design built on the principles of promoting the development of leadership skills, professionalism, ethics, humanism and service to others.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences

Principal investigator: Gwen Halaas, MD, MBA
Senior associate dean, education

The University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences is enhancing medical education through advanced simulation and telemedicine technologies to develop skills specific to the needs of rural or remote communities. This program involves teams of interprofessional students and teaches interprofessional competencies along with rural health care skills.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Arden Dingle, MD
Professor, psychiatry

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine is developing and implementing strategies to nurture excellent communicators who will use technology to support information exchange and empathetic interactions with individuals and diverse groups in multiple settings for numerous preventive health, health maintenance and health care delivery purposes. This new medical school is in one of the most medically underserved areas of the United States, and its transformative program will place medical students at health centers in impoverished rural settlements in unincorporated areas along the U.S.-Mexican border.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of Utah School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Sara Lamb, MD
Associate dean for education, curriculum

The University of Utah School of Medicine is adapting a data-aggregation tool developed and proven effective by its associated health system to create an education model that emphasizes cost reduction and connects education to patient-related outcomes. The goal is to increase the value of training medical students while reducing related costs.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

University of Washington School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Michael Ryan, MD
Associate dean, curriculum

The University of Washington School of Medicine is implementing a new curriculum structure across its sites in Washington, Wyoming, Montana, Alaska and Idaho that incorporates clinical training during the basic science years and basic science into the clinical years. Students begin with a foundation phase, continue with a 12-month patient care phase and end with a 15-month career exploration and focus phase. The school is also implementing a process to continuously improve its curriculum.

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The AMA awarded each consortium member a grant for its transformative medical education projects in key innovation areas.

Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

Principal investigator: Kimberly Lomis, MD
Associate dean, undergraduate medical education

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Vanderbilt University School of Medicine's Curriculum 2.0 aims to create master adaptive learners—physicians who will learn, engage in guided self-assessment and adapt to the evolving needs of their patients and the health care system throughout their careers. All students are embedded in the health care workplace beginning with the earliest phases of their undergraduate medical education. These early clinical experiences provide them with opportunities to participate in a variety of clinical settings, assuming increasing responsibilities as they acquire new competencies.

Learning communities, comprehensive learning portfolios and coaching from trained faculty help students acquire and practice self-directed learning skills. Vanderbilt is continuously improving the logistics of its educational portfolio and is currently developing a GPS to further assist students in navigating the curriculum.

Other educational innovations produced at Vanderbilt include integrated science courses in the 3rd and 4th year of medical school and milestone-based student assessments for the core clerkships and all clinical rotations.


Transforming medical education at Vanderbilt

Vanderbilt Video

“We do not attain the health outcomes for our patients and populations that we really should be attaining, and in the past I think it's been easy for us to foist that off onto policymakers, reimbursement schemes, etc. This is education stepping forward and saying, you know, maybe we own a piece of this problem and can we better prepare our trainees to do the things they're now called upon to do.” — Kimberly Lomis, MD


Discover how the consortium schools are transforming medical education.