AMA State Advocacy Summit event graphic

The 2023 State Advocacy Summit will be held on Jan. 12-14, 2023 in Marana, Arizona. Please note that the times and room assignments are subject to change. All times are in Mountain Standard time (MST).

4:30–5:45 p.m.

Cocktails & conversation: Time to (re)connect

6 p.m.

Welcome

Speaker

  • James L. Madara, MD, executive vice president and CEO, American Medical Association (AMA)

6–7:15 p.m.

The current political and legislative landscape: What it means

Speaker

  • Charlie Cook, founder and contributor, Cook Political Report with Amy Walter; political analyst, National Journal

Called “the man who knows more about politics than anyone else” by the Washingtonian and “the Picasso of election analysis” by the Wall Street Journal, Charlie Cook will provide unparalleled insight and analysis on today’s state and federal political and legislative environments in a balanced, nonpartisan way. He will discuss what policy decisions are forthcoming and what lies ahead for America.

Question & answer session to follow.

Cocktail reception immediately to follow (*to include heavy hors d'oeuvres).


7–8 a.m.

Networking breakfast

8:15–8:30 a.m.

Welcome & meeting kick-off

Speaker and lead moderator

  • Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, MD, chair, Board of Trustees, AMA

8:30–9:30 a.m.

Healing the healer: Legislative and regulatory advocacy to support physician wellness

Moderator

  • J. Corey Feist, JD, MBA, co-founder, Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Foundation

Panelists

  • The Honorable Amish Shah, MD, representative, Arizona House of Representatives  
  • Melina Davis, CEO and executive vice president, Medical Society of Virginia
  • Kathy Lombardo, MD, former member, Minnesota Board of Medical Practice

Support for enhancing physician wellness is growing and there are increasing best practices for medical societies to consider in 2023. This includes state legislative, regulatory and private sector advocacy—topics this session’s participants are especially well suited to discuss. There currently are at least five states that have enacted legislation to provide confidential wellness and career fatigue care to physicians and other health care professionals—Arizona is one of the latest to do so. Its new bill was championed by one of our panelists, an emergency physician and state legislator.

Policies are only successful when they are effectively implemented and turned into action, something the Medical Society of Virginia has firsthand experience in by driving a law, enacted in 2019, that is now helping connect thousands of physicians to care for wellness, burnout and other related areas. Medical boards also have a role to play. In this session, you will hear from a state medical board member who took concrete action to help physicians remove stigmatizing questions from medical licensing questions that often serve as a barrier to care.

Question & answer session to follow.

9:30–10:45 a.m.

Navigating reproductive health care after Dobbs

Moderator

  • Jack Resneck Jr., MD, president, AMA

Panelists

  • Marschall Smith, executive director, Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission
  • Colleen McNicholas, DO, legislative chair, American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' Missouri Section and chief medical officer, Planned Parenthood of the St. Louis Region and Southwest Missouri
  • The Honorable Richard Pan, MD, MPH, former senator, California State Senate and physician advisor, Medical Education Governance and Policy, AMA
  • Rachel Rebouché, JD, dean, Temple University Beasley School of Law

Since the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, abortion is now severely restricted if not entirely prohibited in approximately half the states in the nation. These laws are often ambiguous, may or may not recognize exceptions for medical emergencies and other circumstances, and provide little guidance for physicians to determine when and what kind of care is permitted. These laws have far-reaching implications on a wide range of issues, including multi-state licensure, telehealth, privacy, medical education, physician workforce shortages, liability and countless other issues.

Additionally, subjecting physicians to criminal prosecution, civil litigation and professional discipline has repercussions across state lines, even when the activity is otherwise lawful in another state. In this session, we will explore the legal, medical and practical implications of abortion bans and discuss ways to protect the practice of medicine.

Question & answer session to follow.

10:45–11 a.m. 

Networking break

11–Noon

Scope of practice: The value of data to drive policy

Moderator

  • Claude Brunson, MD, executive director, Mississippi State Medical Association

Panelists

  • Bryan Batson, MD, CEO, Hattiesburg Clinic
  • David C. Chan, Jr., MD, PhD, associate professor of health policy, Stanford University and senior fellow, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research

Data has always been a key part of policy discussions on scope of practice, including data comparing cost, utilization and the quality of care provided by physicians versus other health care professionals. This discussion will center on two recent studies that explore this topic using high-quality data and analysis. Both examine the cost, utilization and quality of care provided by physicians compared to non-physicians, each taking a slightly different focus.

We will hear from Bryan Batson, MD, CEO of Hattiesburg Clinic, who will share findings from Hattiesburg Clinic’s analysis of data as summarized in Targeting Value-Based Care with Physician-led Care Teams, which focuses on improving the quality of care provided to the Clinic’s patients while reducing overall costs. While not the original intent of the study, the findings provide key data for scope of practice policy debates.

We will also learn from David C. Chan, Jr., MD, PhD, whose recently published study, The Productivity of Professions: Evidence from the Emergency Department, examines the cost and quality of care by nurse practitioners and physicians as viewed through a productivity lens. During this session, you will gain key takeaways from each study and a sharpened understanding for how the power of data can drive policy decisions by lawmakers.

Question & answer session to follow.

Noon–1:15 p.m.

Lunch & learn: Road to the recovery plan  

Introduced by

  • Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, MD, chair, Board of Trustees, AMA

Speaker

  • Todd Unger, SVP and chief experience officer, American Medical Association

Todd Unger, in his role as AMA’s chief experience officer, has the perfect seat from which to provide an inside look at the development and fielding of the AMA’s Recovery Plan for America’s Physicians campaign. He will share background on the campaign’s inspiration, design and media approach. In addition to sharing key metrics of the campaign to date, Todd will provide candid learnings on the approach, talk about how states and specialty societies can tie into the campaign's momentum.

Question & answer session to follow.

1:15–1:30 p.m.

Networking break

1:30–2:45 p.m.

State departments of insurance—2023 priorities

Moderator

  • Joel Ario, managing director, Manatt Health

Panelists

  • The Honorable Michael Humphreys, acting commissioner, Pennsylvania Insurance Department

Additional panelists to be announced.

Utilization management, network adequacy, mental health parity, telehealth, value-based care, benefit design—across these and other fronts regulators have a critical role to play in many health care issues important to physicians. During this session, we will hear from several state regulators on their 2023 priorities and what regulatory health care issues they believe are coming down the pike for their departments and departments of insurance across the county. Panelists will also discuss the critical role that physicians and physicians' organizations can play in informing departments’ of insurance regulatory work.

Question & answer session to follow.

2:45–3:45 p.m.

Competition and antitrust policy: What’s going on?

Moderator

  • Henry Allen, JD, MPA, senior attorney, Advocacy Resource Center, AMA

Panelists

  • Diana Moss, PhD, president, American Antitrust Institute
  • Thomas (Tim) Greaney, JD, research professor of law, UC Hastings College of the Law, San Francisco
  • Barak Richman, JD, PhD, Katharine T. Bartlett professor of law and professor of business administration, Duke University

The waves of health care integration have mostly failed. Cities like Pittsburgh, Boston and San Francisco are controlled by just one or two dominant multihospital systems. These systems drive up health care costs and marginalize physicians who want to remain independent. What can be done about these trends? Is the physician union a promising response to tensions within large hospital systems?

Moreover, 75% of metropolitan statistical area health insurance markets are what economists identify as "highly concentrated." Typically, health insurers in these and other geographic areas face little competition when purchasing the services of physicians. How can antitrust better protect physicians from health insurer buyer power?

In this session, leading experts on competition policy and antitrust in health care will offer their thoughts on the questions above and provide recommendations for competition and health care management policy.

Question & answer session to follow.

3:45–4 p.m. 

Networking break

4–5 p.m. 

Telehealth: Advancing policies to ensure high-quality care

Moderator

  • Jared Augenstein, director, Manatt Health

Panelists

  • Shannon Dowler, MD, chief medical officer, NC Medicaid (invited)
  • Mohammad Dar, MD, senior medical director, Payment & Care Delivery Innovation, MassHealth
  • Jacqueline Marks, senior manager, Manatt Health
  • Sarvam TerKonda, MD, chair, Federation of State Medical Boards

We all know the pandemic moved telehealth adoption by leaps and bounds. This was made possible by the swift implementation of telehealth by physician practices and action by state lawmakers to pass measures to expand coverage, payment and equitable access to telehealth. As the digital landscape continues to evolve and telehealth becomes further embedded in physician practices, lawmakers and regulators are facing decisions on which policies should be made permanent or refined to align with the evolving landscape. While coverage and payment for telehealth remain top priorities, numerous other policies are important to ensure patient access to high quality telehealth, including from their community physician. During this panel we will discuss these priorities from various perspectives with the goal of providing actionable solutions.

Question & answer session to follow.

Cocktail reception immediately to follow.


8–9 a.m.

AMA Advocacy breakfast

Moderator

  • Todd Askew, senior vice president, Advocacy, AMA

Panelists

  • Cynthia Brown, vice president, Government Affairs, AMA
  • Margaret Garikes, vice president, Regulatory Affairs, AMA
  • Kai Sternstein, vice president, Advocacy Resource Center, AMA

Meet your AMA Advocacy team and learn about the wealth of resources that exist to assist you in your advocacy. Hear about the priorities that lay ahead in 2023—both in Washington, D.C., and around the country—and how our team works together to ensure that our collective advocacy goals can be achieved on behalf of physicians and their patients.

Question & answer session to follow.

9:15 a.m.

Welcome back

Speaker and lead moderator

  • Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, MD, chair, Board of Trustees, AMA

9:30–10:30 a.m.

Reforming prior authorization for patients and physicians

Moderator

  • Joel Ario, managing director, Manatt Health

Panelists

  • Carl Schmid, MBA, executive director, HIV+ Hepatitis Policy Institute
  • The Honorable Kay Kirkpatrick, MD, senator, Georgia State Senate
  • Debra Patt, MD, president, Texas Society of Clinical Oncology

Prior authorization requirements have now increased to levels that are unsustainable for most physician practices. Meanwhile, patients, particularly those with chronic health conditions, are most impacted by the delays or denials of care. In this session, we will hear from policymakers and stakeholders about the need to address the growing prior authorization burden and strategies and potential solutions for doing so.

Question & answer session to follow.

10:30–11:30 a.m.

The nation’s overdose and death epidemic: What will it take for policymakers to listen to physicians?

Moderator

  • Bobby Mukkamala, MD, chair, AMA Substance Use and Pain Care Task Force and immediate past chair, Board of Trustees, AMA

Panelists

  • Edwin C. Chapman, MD, co-founder and secretary of the board, Leadership Council for Healthy Communities
  • Ruchi Fitzgerald, MD, assistant professor, Departments of Family Medicine and Psychiatry/Behavioral Sciences, Rush University and associate program director, Rush Addiction Medicine Fellowship
  • Beth Darnall, PhD, professor and director, Stanford Pain Relief Innovations Lab, Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

More individuals than ever are dying from a drug-related overdose—primarily from illicitly manufactured fentanyl, methamphetamine and cocaine. Deaths related to prescription opioids and heroin remain at near-historic highs. Young people and Black and Brown Americans are dying at the fastest growing rates. Women with substance use disorders face particular stigma and scorn—those that are pregnant, postpartum and parenting face additional scrutiny and punitive actions. Progress to remove barriers to evidence-based care for substance use disorders remains a struggle for many reasons, including health insurance companies’ and other payers’ opposition.

Patients with pain continue to lack coverage for affordable, accessible non-opioid pain care, and they continue to be nonconsensually tapered from opioid therapy. Harm reduction measures have largely been limited to naloxone even as the need increases for additional strategies such as sterile needle and syringe exchange services. The challenges are considerable but medical societies have advocacy options that will increase access to evidence-based care.

This session will provide clear, actionable strategies for what medical societies can do to prevent deaths and improve patient outcomes.

Question & answer session to follow.

Noon

Meeting adjourned

Boxed lunches are provided at the conclusion.

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