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Governing Council Elections

The AMA-YPS was accepting nominations for the following leadership positions on the AMA-YPS Governing Council:

  • Chair-elect, who will serve a three-year term: one year as Chair-elect, one year as Chair, and one year as Immediate Past Chair; and
  • Delegate, who will serve a two-year term.
  • Member At-large, who will serve a one-year term

Nomination forms were due May 23, 2014. After this date, nominations will be accepted only on June 6 during this year's AMA-YPS Annual Assembly Meeting. Terms of office will begin at the close of the Annual Meeting.

Visit the website for more information on AMA-YPS leadership opportunities.

Additional information on positions and duties can be found in the AMA-YPS Internal Operating Procedures.

Candidate profiles, available for viewing below, will be posted to the website as nominations are received by the AMA-YPS. Delegates to the AMA-YPS will be sent a full set of candidate materials prior to the Annual Meeting.

AMA-YPS Governing Council Candidates

Chair-Elect – Mark J. Milstein, MD

Chair-Elect – Mark J. Milstein, MD

New York, New York

Statement of Interest: My experience in the Young Physicians Section since 2007 has been incredible.  Representing the interests of the young physicians of my state and serving the YPS as chair of Reference and Handbook Review Committees are responsibilities I love more every time the opportunity arises.  Additionally, I've been able to see what makes the YPS successful and what gets us bogged down.  In running for Chair-Elect, I hope to work with the rest of GC to make our positives shine.

Locally, with the MSSNY YPS, I have been successful in outreach to motivated and engaged new doctors to help them get involved in organized medicine.  In addition to representing the will of the YPS to the rest of the AMA, I hope to continue this outreach on the national level.  We have many under-represented state and specialty societies in the YPS.  We are strongest at our fullest and I believe that a coordinated effort can help grow our numbers, increasing the voice and ever growing importance of the YPS.  Our concerns are the concerns of the AMA – access to care, scope of practice, maintenance of certification/licensure, and navigating the rapidly changing healthcare environment are all issues that we must take the lead in addressing.


I thank the assembly in advance for its support and I look forward to serving the YPS.

Delegate – Hilary E. Fairbrother, MD, MPH

Delegate – Hilary E. Fairbrother, MD, MPH

New York, New York

Endorsed by: Medical Society of the State of New York, Young Physicians Section of the Medical Society of the State of New York, American College of Emergency Physicians


Statement of Interest: My name is Hilary Fairbrother and I want to be your next Delegate to the AMA House of Delegates. I have spent the last year as your Alternate Delegate under the talented Dr. Steve Chen. I have read and researched, I have assisted Dr. Chen in his work as delegate, and with the help of many YPS members, the two of us were able to fulfill all of the advocacy goals that were asked by the YPS. I truly believe that this is what it means to be a successful delegation and I plan on continuing this strong relationship with the AMA HOD.


Where I think that we can make progress is obtaining feedback from the YPS membership. We have a current handbook review, but there are so many items of business in such a limited amount of time I fear that we do not always obtain the will of the YPS. We must continue to innovate our approach to soliciting feedback from the YPS. We should strive to obtain feedback from YPS members who may not be able to attend the meeting or may have a very limited amount of time to read resolutions and reports before attending the conference.

One of the ways I believe that we can achieve this goal is through the use of social media. We currently have an online forum for you to leave testimony on resolutions prior to the YPS meeting. It is convoluted and difficult to use. I believe that we can extend our dialogue and receive more educated input through better use of our Facebook page, and by starting a Twitter account. Through this method, we could institute programs such as "Resolution/Report of the Day." Without blast emailing our members we could solicit educated feedback from YPS members. This would enable your Delegate and Alternate to have a better idea of how to best represent the will of the delegation.

Member At-Large –Erick Eiting, MD, MPH, MMM, FAAEM

Member At-Large –Erick Eiting, MD, MPH, MMM, FAAEM

Los Angeles, California

Statement of Interest: As young physicians, we are frequently told that we are the future of medicine. This could not be more incorrect.  We are the face and driving force of change in the present in the House of Medicine.  We are at an important transition period in healthcare.  Young physicians have the ability and enthusiasm to fight for a system that allows us to provide better care for our patients.  I humbly ask for your vote to serve as a leader in that fight.

Member At-Large – Ryan C. W. Hall, MD

Member At-Large – Ryan C. W. Hall, MD

Lake Mary, Florida

Statement of Interest: I have had the pleasure of serving in the YPS for the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) since 2008.  As a member of YPS, I have served on the YPS Reference Committee, numerous Handbook Review Committees, and since I was a YPS delegate, I was able to attend the AMA National Advocacy Conference.  I have great affinity for the YPS since it provided me with my first real opportunity to become active in organized medicine on a national level.  In part because of the YPS, I have had the opportunity to become more involved in my state medical societies (FMA, FPS), as well as nationally in other medical societies such as the American Psychiatric Association and Southern Psychiatric Association. I would hope that my cumulative experience in organized medicine (e.g., serving as Treasurer of Southern Psychiatric Association, serving on the Ethics Committee of Florida Psychiatric Society, serving as a Counselor in AAPL, being a participant in the University of Florida/Florida Medical Association Leadership Academy), along with my experiences in private practice and academic medicine (e.g., teaching and conducting medical school admission interviews) would provide me with a unique skill set and breadth of experience to be an effective member at large for the YPS Board.

Member At-Large – Kusum Punjabi, MD

Member At-Large – Kusum Punjabi, MD

Monroe, New Jersey

Statement of Interest: Avoiding head CT scanning in stable patients with minor head injuries who meet low risk criteria; avoiding indwelling foley catheters in stable patients who can void on their own; avoiding prescribing antibiotics in patients with no obvious signs of infections; early engagement of palliative and hospice care for patients who will benefit from it, etc. are just some of the new guidelines for the "Choosing Wisely" program developed by Young Physicians, who have to practice "standard of care" medicine within cost constraints. Besides learning to be a new doctor and managing healthcare costs, contract negotiations, starting a practice, the Affordable Care Act, ICD10 coding, junior faculty responsibilities, retirement planning, finding the right mentor etc. are some of the other issues facing today's Young Physicians. Residency does not always equip us with all the tools necessary for surviving in the real world. In such a circumstance, it is always comforting to belong to a group where there are others facing similar issues so we can learn from each other.  For me, this is the true benefit of the AMA Young Physician Section. Through this group issues pertaining to young physicians can be discussed and resolutions can be developed to address such issues. As the Member At-Large Representative, I hope to create an increased awareness and membership of the AMA-YPS so that more Young Physicians emerge as leaders in healthcare and make such positive changes as the Choosing Wisely program that impact us for the rest of our long careers in medicine.