• A
  • |
  • A
  • Text size

OMSS Education - Quality and Patient Safety

*View webcast to earn continuing medical education(CME) credit.
--Free for AMA members; $30-45 for non-members.
*ICD-10: Actions physician's need to be taking now to prepare for the regulatory mandate (Nov. 2013)
*Physicians Leading Change for Better Outcomes (Nov. 2013)
*The role of the physician as a leader in patient safety and quality: (Nov. 2013)

Aligning medical staff and hospital interests for better outcomes.

View the program description and register for access to the webcast.

*Engaging Patients to Take Charge of their Health Care through Motivational Interviewing (June 2013)
*Physician wellness: (June 2013)

The medical and legal shift toward a culture of safety
View the program description and register for access to the webcast.

*Primer on Medicare Hospital Conditions of Participations (CoPs) (Nov. 2012)
*Physician Quality Scoring Metrics, Interpretation and Implications (Nov. 2012)
*Engaging Members of the Medical Staff to Measure and Improve Quality (Nov. 2011)
*Future of the Medical Staff Organization (Nov. 2011)
*Reducing the Readmissions Rate in a Hospital (June 2011)
*From Statewide to Bedside Transformation (June 2011)
Leadership in Health Care Change: If Not Physicians, then Who? (June 2011)
The Intersection of Quality, Stress and Fatigue (June 2010)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Laura Maynard

Description

Quality improvement efforts at the clinical area level are frequently hampered by low levels of engagement and moral within a given unit. Before busy and often overwhelmed caregivers can be expected to care about quality, they need to care about their work, but they cannot sustain long term levels of engagement at work unless they take better care of themselves. The data on lack of self-care among healthcare workers is undeniable, and needs to be addressed through better awareness, training, tools, and interventions that bring joy, a sense of control, and a sense of purpose back to work. This presentation is designed to prepare leaders to enhance their level of resilience as a prerequisite for sustainable quality improvement. Moreover, when quality improvement is framed and implemented as a way to make care delivery safer, simpler, and easier for clinicians, it provides each of us with what we desperately want at work: more autonomy, a sense of mastery, and a sense of purpose. In summary, quality improvement efforts often fail to enhance caregiver resilience before expecting higher levels of care quality from dedicated but overwhelmed staff - here is what you can do to turn that around.

Learning Objectives

  1. Measure unit level norms that enhance vs. hinder work-life balance.
  2. Integrate the concepts of fatigue, social support, and familiarity with colleagues as factors which protect against or worsen the experience of a stress response (and burnout) in individuals.
  3. Demonstrate and implement the "learning from defects" tool to find and fix defects, influence patient outcomes, and achieve more meaning and purpose at work.

Download lecture materials

Organizing Your Medical Staff to Effectively Perform in an Evolving Environment (Nov. 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Rosalio Lopez, MD

Description

As Health Care Reform continues to evolve and change, hospital medical staffs will inevitably change. In order to effectively perform in the shifting environment and to ensure patient safety and quality of care it is critical to organize your medical staff accordingly. In this educational program you will be armed with the knowledge to organize your hospital’s medical staff based on both consumerism and patient safety. This program will demonstrate how to compete and get organized in today’s challenging environment in order to successfully perform as physicians and provide quality care to your patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss how to organize your medical staff in the current environment.
  2. Demonstrate how your medical staff can compete in today’s healthcare setting.
  3. Create effective strategies to ensure patient safety and quality of care.

Download lecture materials

Promoting a Culture of Safety (Nov. 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

J. Bryan Sexton, PhD

Description

According to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), "in a culture of safety, people are not merely encouraged to work toward change; they take action when it is needed." Leadership is a key ingredient in creating a culture of safety. Organizations can only improve upon their safety with direction and guidance from their leaders. Senior staff must be the driving force behind promoting a culture of safety through demonstrating their own commitment to safety of care and providing the necessary resources to foster an environment conducive to change. This program will demonstrate how healthcare professionals can work together as a team to promote a culture of safety and ultimately enhance patient care.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss the attributes of successful leaders.
  2. Explain how to work together as a team of healthcare professionals, e.g. nursing, administration and medical staff to ensure patient safety.
  3. Demonstrate how to identify problems, fashion solutions to those problems and implement changes, which ultimately improve safety.

Download lecture materials

Hospital-Employed Physicians and the MSO: Ramifications for Quality and Professionalism (June 2009)
Keeping Senior Physicians in Practice (June 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • John A. Fromson, MD
  • Betsy White Williams, PhD, MPH
  • David Weber, MD

Description

The well-documented impending physician workforce shortage, coupled with the recent economic downturn, points to the need for physicians to work beyond traditional retirement age. Organizations interested in successfully keeping senior physicians in practice will recognize there are many aspects to consider such as competency, adjusting to changing lifestyles, energy levels, and call. All these factors affect practice productivity, scheduling, coverage and more. This program will help attendees understand the value that senior physicians bring to a practice; the most common age related issues to be aware of; and practical solutions and environmental adjustments to address those issues. Keynote speaker, John A. Fromson, MD, Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, is a nationally recognized expert on physician health. A reaction panel including Betsy White Williams, PhD, MPH and David Weber, MD will discuss three real-life scenarios involving senior physicians in practice.

Learning Objectives

  1. Recognize the most common age-related changes affecting physicians.
  2. Integrate the knowledge of age-related changes with practical tips for either adjusting the practice environment, revising a senior physician's areas of responsibility, consideration of recertification, or recommendation for retirement.

Download lecture materials:

Organized Medical Staff Peer Review Done Right (Nov. 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • S. Jay Jayasankar, MD
  • Elizabeth Snelson, Esq.
  • Robert A. Wise, MD

Description

Peer review is an essential tool in maintaining patient safety and quality of care: through learning and evaluating a physician’s past performance. In this program Dr. Jayasankar will discuss the Massachusetts Principles of Peer Review, of which many were adopted by the American Medical Association (AMA). This information will provide physicians with a guide to developing standards for peer review programs in their hospitals. Dr. Wise will introduce and discuss the Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) and Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE), The Joint Commission’s standards on peer review. Finally Ms. Snelson will present information to aid physicians in understanding peer review pitfalls and to educate them on the legal problems surrounding peer review within hospital medical staffs.

Learning Objectives

  1. Apply the work of the Massachusetts Medical Society to develop appropriate parameters for medical peer review.
  2. Define The Joint Commission’s standards on peer review by organized medical staffs in hospitals.
  3. Discuss the pitfalls and legal problems surrounding peer review and educate practitioners on effective peer review processes.

Download lecture materials:

Physician Hospitals of America: Reclaiming Quality Patient Care through Leadership (June 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • Molly Sandvig, JD
  • John R. Harvey, MD

Description

How we provide and how patients receive healthcare today is changing rapidly. Answers to the questions of who controls growth, how and to whom money is distributed, and most importantly who influences patient care are shifting – and rightly so. The small but influential physician owned and operated hospital industry is playing a dramatic role in that shift and will continue to do so no matter the format, with strong, independent physicians leading the charge.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the status of the physician hospital industry and projections for its future.
  2. Distinguish how physician hospitals in partnership with tax-exempt, general hospitals are creating an integrated approach to healthcare, allowing for better physician-hospital relations and long term success for all involved.
  3. Assess out how physicians in this industry are making a difference in patient care, hospital performance, and community and industry involvement.

Download lecture materials:

Transitioning To An Improved Hospital Discharge (June 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Mark V. Williams, MD

Description

Care coordination at the time of hospital discharge represents an often stressful and sometimes dangerous process for older adults. Discontinuity and fragmentation yields risks of harm to the patient. The current discharge process significantly impacts patient satisfaction, potentially impacts health outcomes, and lacks a consistent, coordinated and safe approach. With the relatively recent development of the specialty of hospital medicine and growth to more than 20,000 hospitalists in the U.S. caring for hospitalized patients, patients' transition from hospital to home or other health care facilities requires attention and modification to optimize quality of care and patient safety.

A review of findings from recent AHRQ-funded research projects focused on the discharge process and the efforts of The John A. Hartford Foundation funded Society of Hospital Medicine BOOST project (Better Outcomes for Older adults through Safe Transitions) provide a foundation for new approaches to improving the hospital discharge process.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify the common potential adverse events that can occur after hospital discharge.
  2. Recognize process measures relevant to hospital discharge.
  3. List the major components of an ideal discharge transition.
  4. Propose a revised process for discharge at their hospital to enhance patient satisfaction and diminish adverse events following the transition from the hospital to the community.

Download lecture materials