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OMSS Education - Medical Staff

*View webcast to earn continuing medical education (CME) credit.
--Free for AMA members; $30-45 for non-members.
*Physicians Leading Change for Better Outcomes (Nov. 2013)
*The role of the physician as a leader in patient safety and quality: (Nov. 2013)

Aligning medical staff and hospital interests for better outcomes.

View the program description and register for access to the webcast.

*The Joint Commission's Leadership Standard on Conflict Management: (June 2013)

Empowering medical staff leaders to advocate to "yes"
View the program description and register for access to webcast.

*Primer on Medicare Hospital Conditions of Participations (CoPs) (Nov. 2012)
*Engaging Members of the Medical Staff to Measure and Improve Quality (Nov. 2011)
*Future of the Medical Staff Organization (Nov. 2011)
Implementing the New Joint Commission Medical Staff Bylaws Standard – MS.01.01.01 (June 2010)
Organizing Your Medical Staff to Effectively Perform in the Evolving Environment (Nov. 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Rosalio Lopez, MD

Description

As Health Care Reform continues to evolve and change, hospital medical staffs will inevitably change. In order to effectively perform in the shifting environment and to ensure patient safety and quality of care it is critical to organize your medical staff accordingly. In this educational program you will be armed with the knowledge to organize your hospital’s medical staff based on both consumerism and patient safety. This program will demonstrate how to compete and get organized in today’s challenging environment in order to successfully perform as physicians and provide quality care to your patients.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss how to organize your medical staff in the current environment.
  2. Demonstrate how your medical staff can compete in today’s healthcare setting.
  3. Create effective strategies to ensure patient safety and quality of care.

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Legal Challenge to an Economic Credentialing Policy (Nov. 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Bruce E. Murphy, MD

Description

The patient-physician relationship is at the heart of medicine. This sacred relationship is the cornerstone of physicians’ practices’. According to the Arkansas Supreme Court in Baptist Health vs. Murphy, 365 Ark. 115, 131, 226, S.W.3d 800, 813 (2006), “the relationship is forged in trust, confidence, rapport, and intimate knowledge. Dr. Bruce Murphy and the other plaintiffs testified that the relationship develops over time, through the care and treatment of chronic conditions and traumatic medical emergencies, with the physician learning the patient’s history and exercising professional judgment in evaluating the patient’s complaints and treating the patient’s ailments.”

The Baptist Health, Arkansas, economic credentialing policy, which was adopted in 2003, was successfully challenged by Dr. Bruce Murphy, 11 other members of his practice, the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Arkansas Medical Society (AMS). This policy allowed the hospital system to interfere with the patient-physician relationship by denying hospital-admitting privileges to medical staff members based on their financial interests.

This educational program will provide an overview of this specific case and the experience Dr. Murphy and his partners faced confronting this challenge. The importance of the patient-physician relationship will be discussed as well as the economic credentialing policy. Finally this program will arm physicians with the knowledge and skills to confront a difficult challenge a medical staff may encounter.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss the importance of the patient-physician relationship in relation to a legal case.
  2. Describe a Medical Staff Economic Credentialing Policy
  3. Explain a landmark lawsuit.
  4. Identify strategies to stay unified and focused as a group.

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The Individual Physician in the Organized Medical Staff: Rights and Wrongs (June 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Elizabeth A. Snelson, Esq.

Description

The American Medical Association (AMA) Organized Medical Staff Section (OMSS) represents medical staffs across the country. As a physician member of your hospital's organized medical staff is critical to know how you are protected and what your rights are within your medical staff bylaws. Where do you stand as a physician member of an organized medical staff? Do you know your rights? Are you concerned about your future practice in the hospital? As a leader, can you answer these questions for your colleagues in your organized medical staff? This program will provide you the necessary knowledge and tools needed to protect yourself as a physician member of your organized medical staff.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe what the law provides for physicians within the organized medical staff.
  2. Discuss what physicians need to both look for and watch out for in their medical staff bylaws.
  3. Illustrate how physicians can protect their rights within their hospitals' organized medical staff.
  4. Distinguish what to expect from accreditation and health policy trends regarding your medical staff membership.

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Organizational Leadership: The Joint Commission Leadership Standards (June 2009)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

Paul Schyve, MD

Description

The organized medical staff is a critical component of the leadership of a hospital. The medical staff leaders, members of the governing body, and the chief executive officer (and other senior administrators) comprise the leadership that is responsible for the quality and safety of care provided within the hospital. Only by these three groups working together can high quality and safe care for patients be achieved. The Joint Commission's newly revised chapter of standards for Leadership - which became effective January 1, 2009 - is designed to facilitate this collaboration.

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the role of a hospital's leadership in achieving quality and safety in patient care.
  2. Identify the shared and individual responsibilities of the three leadership groups for patient safety and quality of care.
  3. Illustrate the mechanisms for achieving collaboration among the three leadership groups.
  4. Determine the importance of a hospital-wide culture of safety and the role of the organization's leadership in its creation and maintenance.

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Hospital-Employed Physicians and the Medical Staff (June 2009)
Organized Medical Staff Peer Review Done Right (Nov. 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • S. Jay Jayasankar, MD
  • Elizabeth Snelson, Esq.
  • Robert A. Wise, MD

Description

Peer review is an essential tool in maintaining patient safety and quality of care: through learning and evaluating a physician’s past performance. In this program Dr. Jayasankar will discuss the Massachusetts Principles of Peer Review, of which many were adopted by the American Medical Association (AMA). This information will provide physicians with a guide to developing standards for peer review programs in their hospitals. Dr. Wise will introduce and discuss the Ongoing Professional Practice Evaluation (OPPE) and Focused Professional Practice Evaluation (FPPE), The Joint Commission’s standards on peer review. Finally Ms. Snelson will present information to aid physicians in understanding peer review pitfalls and to educate them on the legal problems surrounding peer review within hospital medical staffs.

Learning Objectives

  1. Apply the work of the Massachusetts Medical Society to develop appropriate parameters for medical peer review.
  2. Define The Joint Commission’s standards on peer review by organized medical staffs in hospitals.
  3. Discuss the pitfalls and legal problems surrounding peer review and educate practitioners on effective peer review processes.

Download lecture materials:

Organized Medical Staffs & Disruptive Behavior (Nov. 2008)

Webcast is temporarily unavailable.

Faculty

  • Michael J. Schoppmann, Esq, Kern Augustine Conroy & Schoppmann P.C.
  • Elizabeth Snelson, Esq., Counsel to Medical Staffs
  • Robert A. Wise, MD, The Joint Commission

Description

Disruptive Behavior amongst physicians and other health care professionals in hospitals impacts patient safety and the quality of care that is provided and has increasingly become an issue in the present healthcare system. In response, The Joint Commission has created a new standard that took effect in January 2009. This new standard, will require hospital administrators to adopt codes of defining disruptive behavior against the codes of conduct and developing procedures to invoke discipline. In this program Dr. Wise will discuss the new Joint Commission standard on Disruptive Behavior. Mr. Schoppman will describe the consequences to physicians when faced with disruptive behavior allegations. Finally Ms. Snelson will discuss methods for addressing disruptive behavior for Organized Medical Staffs to incorporate in their written processes.

Learning Objectives

  1. Define The Joint Commission's leadership standards regarding disruptive behavior.
  2. Demonstrate what can happen to physicians facing disruptive behavior charges.
  3. Illustrate and educate physicians on issues surrounding disruptive behavior and medical staff processes to effectively address these concerns.

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Physician Hospitals of America: Reclaiming Quality Patient Care through Leadership (June 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • Molly Sandvig, JD
  • John R. Harvey, MD

Description

How we provide and how patients receive healthcare today is changing rapidly. Answers to the questions of who controls growth, how and to whom money is distributed, and most importantly who influences patient care are shifting – and rightly so. The small but influential physician owned and operated hospital industry is playing a dramatic role in that shift and will continue to do so no matter the format, with strong, independent physicians leading the charge.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the status of the physician hospital industry and projections for its future.
  2. Distinguish how physician hospitals in partnership with tax-exempt, general hospitals are creating an integrated approach to healthcare, allowing for better physician-hospital relations and long term success for all involved.
  3. Assess out how physicians in this industry are making a difference in patient care, hospital performance, and community and industry involvement.

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Creating A New Future for A New Day with a Revamped Organized Medical Staff Structure (June 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • Howard Lang, MD
  • Tom Curtis, JD
  • Frank Gamma, JD

Description

We must develop organizations that preserve physician autonomy in a world where medicine has come to be dominated by large corporations. The centerpiece of any healthcare delivery system is the physician-patient interaction, physicians should form organizations that support those interactions and reject the notion of patients as money-winning or money-losing biological structures.

We have the opportunity to recreate the relationships between medical staffs and hospitals. This new paradigm consists of removing the medical staff from the organizational structure of the hospital and declaring the entire organization independent of the hospital.

Physicians would identify with community or regional physician organizations. The organization would not be tied to any one hospital, but instead offers ownership and participation to physicians at any hospital within the relevant service area. The hospitals in the relevant service area would contract for needed patient services with the community or regional physician organizations.

Learning Objectives

  1. Discuss factors that lead to increased tension between medical staffs and hospitals.
  2. Identify methods medical staffs have utilized to retain self-governance.
  3. Describe the function and structure of an alternative to the traditional medical staff structure, including the legal implications.

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Principles for Strengthening the Physician–Hospital Relationship (June 2008)

CME credit is no longer available for this program.

Faculty

  • Stephen T. House, MD
  • James A. Goodyear, MD, FACS

Description

AMA's Principles for Strengthening the Physician–Hospital Relationship (AMA Policy H-225.957) were developed as recommendations for addressing the increasingly conflicted physician-hospital relationship. These principles also serve as a complement to the major revisions to The Joint Commission Medical (TJC) Staff Bylaws Standard MS. 1.20 that were recently adopted by the Joint Commission. Although the AMA has been an active participant in the formation of Standard MS.1.20, the revisions made to the standard do not address all of the necessary aspects of medical staff self governance and other guiding principles for strengthening the physician–hospital relationship. Attendees of this session will receive a copy of the AMA's Principles for Strengthening the Physician–Hospital Relationship to assist with implementation in your hospital.

Learning Objectives

  1. Inform Representatives, Delegates, Alternate Delegates and other Physician Leaders of the content and significance of the AMA Principles for Strengthening the Physician–Hospital Relationship as it relates to protecting medical staff self-governance, while successfully fulfilling the medical staff's responsibility for provision of quality and safe care.
  2. Implement principles in your own setting and serve as the catalyst to implement these principles in your hospital and as a part of your medical staff bylaws.
  3. Develop strategies to achieve a better working relationship between your Medical Staff, the hospital board and senior hospital management.

Download lecture materials