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2014 Annual Meeting Education Programs

The following education programs will be presented in conjunction with the 2014 AMA Organized Medical Staff Section Annual Meeting, June 5-7 at the Hyatt Regency Chicago:

ICD-10: Key actions for practices to prepare for the regulatory mandate

Friday, June 6, 8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
Crystal Ballroom B (Green Level/West Tower)
1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM

Faculty: Stanley Nachimson and Nancy Spector

As the ICD-10 deadline approaches, physicians need to ensure they are prepared for it to prevent disruptions in claims processing and reimbursement. The AMA is well aware of the concerns by physicians about the costs and burden of ICD-10 and has advocated strongly for over a decade to stop it. Physicians, however, need to be prepared for ICD-10, in case it is not stopped or further delayed. 

Nancy Spector, Director of Electronic Medical Systems at the American Medical Association, and Stanley Nachimson, Nachimson Advisors, LLC, will begin with a brief overview of the status of ICD-10, its requirements, and AMA advocacy work. They will then go in depth discussing the work practices need to do to for testing ICD-10, including the types of testing, practice resources needed to complete the testing, and expected outcomes from it. They will also provide details on activities practices should consider during the transition to ICD-10, including talking to key payers about back-up plans, monitoring revenue cycle data, and maintaining practice sustainability if issues arise.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the AMA’s advocacy efforts related to ICD-10.
  2. Explain the different types of ICD-10 testing, practice resources needed to complete the testing, and expected outcomes from it.
  3. List actions needed to maintain practice sustainability while implementing ICD-10.

A global perspective on accountable care organizations

Friday, June 6, 9:15 - 10:15 a.m.
Crystal Ballroom B (Green Level/West Tower)
1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM

Faculty: Grace Terrell, MD, MMM, FACP, FACPE, General Internist and Chief Executive Officer, Cornerstone Healthcare, PA

An Accountable Care Organization (ACO) is an organization of physicians and other health care providers held accountable for the overall quality and cost of care delivered to a defined population of patients. The goal of an ACO is to increase access to care, improve the quality of care, and ensure the efficient delivery of care. The idea behind ACOs is to pay physicians and hospitals for quality rather than volume of service.

Pilot ACO programs, both public and private, have shown mixed results in improving quality and reducing cost. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ Pioneer ACO Model program is a fitting example. While all ACOs participating in the program showed some success in improving quality as compared to traditional Medicare fee-for-service, just over half were able to reduce costs, and only 40 percent were able to reduce costs enough to qualify for bonus payments. After one year, more than a quarter of the ACOs dropped out of the program for various reasons.

This program will provide a global perspective on ACOs. It will explore what has worked and what hasn’t worked thus far for ACOs and their participating physicians and other health care providers. Finally it will discuss whether any of the success of well-established ACOs, such as those that have participated in pilot programs, can be transferable to less experienced entities.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the structural, performance and technical challenges physicians and hospitals may face when forming an accountable care organization.
  2. Discuss what has worked and what hasn’t worked for physicians and health systems participating in the Pioneer ACO Model program and other ACO pilot programs.
  3. Examine whether the success of pilot ACOs can be generalized to less well-organized and experienced entities.

Quality, access, and cost: Improving health care through physician-led interprofessional care teams

Saturday, June 7, 7:45 - 8:45 a.m.
Crystal Ballroom B (Green Level/West Tower)
1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM

Faculty: Robert Probe, MD

From patient-centered medical homes to some of the nation’s largest integrated health care systems, physician-led interprofessional team-based health care has proven to be a successful model in the delivery of high-value health care. Successful interprofessional care teams are characterized by strong physician leadership, effective communication, and the full and efficient use of the expertise and knowledge of each team member.

This program will identify the impetus for interprofessional team-based health care and how this delivery model can help to improve the quality of care while increasing access and reducing cost. It will also examine how successful interprofessional teams are structured and how they function on a day-to-day basis.  Finally, the program will identify and discuss the leadership qualities physicians must possess in order to effectively lead interprofessional care teams.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the factors driving our health care system toward interprofessional team-based care models.
  2. Discuss how interprofessional team-based care can improve the quality of care, while increasing access and reducing cost.
  3. Describe the structure and function of a successful physician-led interprofessional care team.
  4. List the characteristics of an effective physician leader of an interprofessional care team.

Optimizing electronic health records to enhance physician satisfaction

Jointly sponsored with AMA Sections and Special Group
Saturday, June 7, 9:00 - 10:25 a.m.
Crystal Ballroom B (Green Level/West Tower)
1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM

Faculty: Jay Crosson, MD and Steven Stack, MD
Discussion Panel: David Bronson, MD; Nicole Lee, MD, MPH; Ryan Ribeira, MD, MPH; Sumir Saghal, MD and David Welsh, MD

Electronic health records (EHRs) contribute both positively and negatively to physician professional satisfaction. Recent research has shown that while physicians approve of EHRs in concept and recognize the potential of EHRs to someday improve patient care and professional satisfaction, the current state of EHR technology significantly worsens professional satisfaction. As part of its broader effort to ensure sustainable physician practices that result in good health outcomes for patients and greater professional satisfaction for physicians, the American Medical Association (AMA) seeks to identify and advocate for the incorporation into EHRs systems of "physician-friendly" EHR characteristics.

This program will provide an overview of the AMA's findings on the relationship between EHRs and physician satisfaction, and the AMA's ensuing work to identify physician-friendly EHR characteristics. The program will also introduce participants to viewpoints from physicians from a diverse range of practice settings as to what constitutes a physician-friendly EHR. Finally, the program will provide participants the opportunity to offer their own views and exchange ideas on how EHRs might be improved to reach their full potential to improve patient care and professional satisfaction.

Learning objectives:

1. Summarize the key findings of the AMA's research on the relationship between EHRs and physician satisfaction.
2. Describe the AMA's efforts to identify and advocate for the incorporation of physician-friendly EHR characteristics into EHR systems.
3. Discuss the unique EHR-related needs of physicians in various modes of practice.
4. Identify EHR characteristics that are likely to result in good health outcomes for patients and greater professional satisfaction for physicians.

 

Negotiating your employment contract

Saturday, June 7, 10:35 - 11:35 a.m.
Crystal Ballroom B (Green Level/West Tower)
1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM

Faculty: Norman P. Jeddeloh, JD, Partner, Arnstein & Lehr, LLP

Physicians are increasingly entering into employment and other contractual relationships with hospitals, group practices, and other health care organizations and delivery systems. Employment and contractual arrangements can benefit physicians and their patients, but employed physicians face a unique set of challenges as they seek to protect their professional, ethical, and financial interests while maintaining the inviolability of the patient-physician relationship. The AMA has developed a range of products and services to help physicians understand and manage their employment and contractual relationships. Foremost among these are the AMA’s Annotated Model Physician-Hospital Employment Agreement and Annotated Model Physician Practice Employment Agreement, which address the specific needs of physicians who are preparing to negotiate employment contracts with hospitals and group practices, respectively. The AMA has also developed extensive Principles for Physician Employment, which are intended to help physicians, those who employ physicians, and their respective advisors identify and address some of the unique challenges employment can present to professionalism and the practice of medicine.

This program will educate physicians on how to negotiate with potential employers to develop an optimum employment agreement. Using the AMA’s physician employment resources as a guide, the program will address key areas a physician should consider when reviewing a contract, and provide insight on where a physician should focus negotiation efforts by describing which provisions of an employment agreement are most likely to be negotiable. It will also provide strategies to use when negotiating an employment agreement.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify key areas a physician should consider when reviewing an employment agreement.
  2. Identify which areas of an employment agreement are most likely to be negotiable.
  3. Discuss strategies to use when negotiating an employment agreement.